Amid ongoing discussion about a potential break-up of Facebook’s various elements in order to reduce Zuck and Co.’s power, Facebook has this week unveiled a new corporate logo which will help to differentiate Facebook, the parent company, from Facebook’s various apps.

Facebook corporate logo

As explained by Facebook:

“People should know which companies make the products they use. […] Today, we’re updating our company branding to be clearer that these products come from Facebook. We’re introducing a new corporate logo and further distinguishing the Facebook company from the Facebook app, which will keep its own branding.”

The new Facebook logo will be added to all of its apps, with a clear ‘from Facebook’ tag on certain screens.

Here’s an example from Instagram:

Facebook branding in Instagram

And WhatsApp:

Facebook branding in WhatsApp

This will help to better inform users of Facebook’s involvement in each.

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Facebook will be hoping that the new additions also help to appease regulators, in order to avoid a potential break-up of its company. Aside from the aforementioned political debate around such, a recent study conducted by Pew Research found that 71% of people are not aware that Facebook owns Instagram and WhatsApp.

Pew research social media study

That lack of clarity could help to further build the case for its dismantling, in order to help consumers better understand which company is behind each platform, and the information they share within these apps.

Facebook’s in-app branding has actually been in testing for some months – back in March, reverse engineering expert Jane Manchun Wong found an ‘Instagram from Facebook’ tag within Instagram’s back-end code.

Tweet from Jane Manchun Wong

Facebook began rolling out these tags to some surfaces in June, while its latest, broader branding effort was first reported by The Information in August.

Now, we have Facebook’s new branding, distinguished from the regular Facebook logo.

Facebook branding

Will that help to appease politicians and regulators who are calling for a break-up of the social media giant?

That appears to be the only real impetus for Facebook’s branding update, but whether that will be enough to quell debate remains to be seen. Sure, it should make it clearer who owns what – and it should help to increase the number of people who understand how far Facebook’s tentacles now reach. But Facebook will still have all that data, all that personal information, it will still have an unprecedented amount of potential influence over people across the world.

But it’s something – Facebook is showing that it’s taking the discussion seriously, and that it is looking to address such concerns.

Facebook Launches Updated Company Logo Which Will be Included in All of its Apps admin Tổng hợp
Amid ongoing discussion about a potential break-up of Facebook's various elements in order to reduce Zuck and Co.'s power, Facebook has this week unveiled a new corporate logo which will help to differentiate Facebook, the parent company, from Facebook's various apps. As explained by Facebook: 'People should know which companies make the products they use.  Today,...
Amid ongoing discussion about a <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/oct/19/elizabeth-warren-facebook-break-up">potential break-up of Facebook's various elements</a> in order to reduce Zuck and Co.'s power, Facebook has this week <a href="https://www.facebook.com/business/news/introducing-our-new-company-brand/">unveiled a new corporate logo</a> which will help to differentiate Facebook, the parent company, from Facebook's various apps. <div align="center"><img src="https://www.socialmediatoday.com/user_media/diveimage/facebook_brand.gif" alt="Facebook corporate logo" data-imagemodel="-1" /></div> As explained by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/business/news/introducing-our-new-company-brand/">Facebook</a>: <em>"People should know which companies make the products they use. [...] Today, we’re updating our company branding to be clearer that these products come from Facebook. We’re introducing a new corporate logo and further distinguishing the Facebook company from the Facebook app, which will keep its own branding."</em> The new Facebook logo will be added to all of its apps, with a clear 'from Facebook' tag on certain screens. Here's an example from Instagram: <div align="center"><img src="https://www.socialmediatoday.com/user_media/diveimage/facebook_brand2.jpg" alt="Facebook branding in Instagram" data-imagemodel="80842" /></div> And WhatsApp: <div align="center"><img src="https://www.socialmediatoday.com/user_media/diveimage/Facebook_brand3.png" alt="Facebook branding in WhatsApp" data-imagemodel="80844" /></div> This will help to better inform users of Facebook's involvement in each. <div class="hybrid-ad-wrapper hide-small show-large"> <div class="hybrid-ad-inner-wrapper"> <div class="hide-small show-large"> <div data-container-ad-unit-id="/21662595662/socialmediatoday/socialmediatodayhybrid2-desktop"> <div class="row native-ad editorial"> <div class="medium-3 columns native-ad-image-wrapper"><img class="native-ad-image" src="https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/pagead/imgad?id=CICAgKDnq8-_tAEQARgBMgjN9FnIv9Ok9w" alt="" /></div> <div class="medium-9 columns native-ad-copy-wrapper"> <div class="native-ad-sponsor"><img class="favicon" src="https://d12v9rtnomnebu.cloudfront.net/logo/corporate/favicon.png" alt="" /><span class="label">RETAIL DIVE</span></div> <a class="native-ad-title" href="https://adclick.g.doubleclick.net/pcs/click?xai=AKAOjssS2IQIqW7-3y17KHs26dd2x_AIhtFb-X3J4858drCkVBCk7_otMHYtilmc48-fn5R6pqDH0xME7F3tdln98Bt3QSJBVhrtiTLqDY347anaOJgZtQfq2195qAvpwFKb_W26eewxMhj4byPmnMgCjm8bbp6oY8N0ZHz3N2SDMN5Lz7gYOoworBLAreqIam_8CgU4JIec_IUJKNcGBxroO3_BMbc_oIbfAHIcxoBh65PDmBKCaGCf-H4g2E_NuoLuAD98m-RqrGHmby71ykBON7jMrSSs_StYIfXcwQYQyDOzNwrlF1n5lrf_&sig=Cg0ArKJSzOjmBy3ysRYcEAE&urlfix=1&adurl=https://www.retaildive.com/signup/holiday/" target="_blank">The Latest Holiday Retail News in Your Inbox Every Week</a> <p class="native-ad-copy">The Retail Dive: Holiday Edition will keep you up to speed with the latest news and trends in our free, weekly newsletter.</p> <a class="button material" href="https://adclick.g.doubleclick.net/pcs/click?xai=AKAOjssS2IQIqW7-3y17KHs26dd2x_AIhtFb-X3J4858drCkVBCk7_otMHYtilmc48-fn5R6pqDH0xME7F3tdln98Bt3QSJBVhrtiTLqDY347anaOJgZtQfq2195qAvpwFKb_W26eewxMhj4byPmnMgCjm8bbp6oY8N0ZHz3N2SDMN5Lz7gYOoworBLAreqIam_8CgU4JIec_IUJKNcGBxroO3_BMbc_oIbfAHIcxoBh65PDmBKCaGCf-H4g2E_NuoLuAD98m-RqrGHmby71ykBON7jMrSSs_StYIfXcwQYQyDOzNwrlF1n5lrf_&sig=Cg0ArKJSzOjmBy3ysRYcEAE&urlfix=1&adurl=https://www.retaildive.com/signup/holiday/" target="_blank">Subscribe Today</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Facebook will be hoping that the new additions also help to appease regulators, in order to avoid a potential break-up of its company. Aside from the aforementioned political debate around such, a <a href="https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/new-survey-finds-majority-of-us-adults-dont-realize-that-facebook-owns-ins/564696/">recent study</a> conducted by Pew Research found that 71% of people are not aware that Facebook owns Instagram and WhatsApp. <div align="center"><img src="https://www.socialmediatoday.com/user_media/diveimage/pew_digital_topics1.png" alt="Pew research social media study" data-imagemodel="79686" /></div> That lack of clarity could help to further build the case for its dismantling, in order to help consumers better understand which company is behind each platform, and the information they share within these apps. Facebook's in-app branding has actually been in testing for some months - back in March, reverse engineering expert <a href="https://twitter.com/wongmjane">Jane Manchun Wong</a> found an <a href="https://twitter.com/wongmjane/status/1111427714920022019">'Instagram from Facebook' tag</a> within Instagram's back-end code. <div align="center"><img src="https://www.socialmediatoday.com/user_media/diveimage/wong_tweet.jpg" alt="Tweet from Jane Manchun Wong" data-imagemodel="80846" /></div> Facebook began rolling out these tags to some surfaces <a href="https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2019/11/introducing-our-new-company-brand/">in June</a>, while its latest, broader branding effort was first reported by <a href="https://www.theinformation.com/articles/facebook-to-add-its-name-to-instagram-whatsapp">The Information</a> in August. Now, we have Facebook's new branding, distinguished from the regular Facebook logo. <div align="center"><img src="https://www.socialmediatoday.com/user_media/diveimage/facebook_brand.jpg" alt="Facebook branding" data-imagemodel="80841" /></div> Will that help to appease politicians and regulators who are calling for a break-up of the social media giant? That appears to be the only real impetus for Facebook's branding update, but whether that will be enough to quell debate remains to be seen. Sure, it should make it clearer who owns what - and it should help to increase the number of people who understand how far Facebook's tentacles now reach. But Facebook will still have all that data, all that personal information, it will still have an unprecedented amount of potential influence over people across the world. But it's something - Facebook is showing that it's taking the discussion seriously, and that it is looking to address such concerns.